Recording Your Voice - A few tips that will help you give it your best!

recording your voice

Recording your voice is always a bit of a strain. Most of us (singers) do not like to hear our recorded voices until after many years of training.

More than once I have almost lost a student after recording him/her in my studio to show how much improvement has been made --- only to find the poor singer in tears as he/she listened to the flaws - not the merits.

I learned my lesson the hard way. Recording your voice (and listening seriously) is an event that must be well-timed. But eventually, most of us who persist in learning how to sing well do learn to appreciate the sounds that we have worked so hard to produce.

In the spirit of "I am ready!", here are a few tips that can help you make the recording process more fun and easier. Watch the video and read more below...

1. RECORDING YOUR VOICE well needs preparation.
Get yourself into good vocal shape before you go into the "studio" - even if your studio is your bedroom. When you decide to do a more serious recording - the kind that will tell you where stand right NOW in your singing ability - you need to be in your best shape so that your recording is as "true" a record as possible.

When I went into the recording studio recently, I realized at the end of the 4.5 hour session, that I had not done enough work to build up my vocal stamina. While the songs (8 of them) came out well - I realized that my voice and body were becoming quite tired as the hours went by.

Had I gone into "training" several days before the recording, I think my voice would have stayed fresher longer. By training, I mean I would do this:

• 5 days before recording - sing for 60 minutes
• 4 days before recording - sing for a 45 minutes
• 3 days before recording - sing for 70 minutes or so
• 2 days before recording - sing for 45 minutes
• The day before recording - sing for 45 minutes

My Process - Each day, after I warm up well, I sing through all the songs with as much energy as I would sing them in the studio - full voice - full of emotion. As though I am doing a studio performance. This is the kind of physical work-out that gets my voice into shape but does not tire me out for the day of recording.

Younger singers, who are less-experienced will sing for a lesser amount of time. You need to find the amount of singing that gradually gets you in shape, but not sung-out. "Training" also means to have enough rest time for your voice.

The point is to build the stamina required to sing well for a chunk of time in the high-energy situation that you will find in a recording studio. But to go there with a fresh voice!

2. Recording your voice is more easily accomplished with a "producer" in the room with you. That producer may be your best friend, or your Dad, or the drummer in your band.

He/She should be someone who knows your voice well, who understands and appreciates the kind of music you are singing, and who is very supportive of your musical dreams.

This person is there to tell you when you are doing your best and to encourage you either to do more or to take a break. When a good, reliable producer says - "OK, that's a take," you can be pretty sure that you have done a good job.

3. Simple, but important, be comfortable when you are recording. Some people like to go to the studio dressed to kill. But beware of "difficult" clothing. You've got to breathe easily and move without a care.

Wear clothes that make you feel good, but at ease. Take off your jewelry. Don't wear things that dangle, buzz or tinkle. Wear comfy shoes.

And enjoy the process!


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